Pride Mubarak

Guest post by Lina Free

So does Ramadan mean no sex for the whole month? Hello- I’m not that kind of Muslim! Ha ha, I just troubling u girl; I kno the thing- my father was Muslim. Eh heh? Yes, Salahuddin was his name. But is only me outta my brothers and sisters get that name. How come? He was always drunk, never had time for us. But I was the last chile; my mother said he felt sorry by then. Salahuddin sounded just like my grandfather Shaheed. Another ‘fullaman’ yes, but that didn’t stop him from drinking and womanizing. When my grandmother ‘ran off’ her head after he got another woman pregnant the same time as she and had to be committed to the Berbice mad house after giving birth to my father- the last child of eight- Shaheed amended his ways. But by then it was too late, the damage already done. Decades afterwards, when I sat behind him in the masjid, watching him prostrate himself in prayer, all I could think about was why I had to sit behind and not beside him. Stop asking all those questions I was scolded. Just keep quiet and do as you are told. Continue reading

PHOTOS: CODE RED Women’s Circles

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The members of CODE RED for Gender Justice at the UWI Cave Hill Campus have been hosting weekly women’s circles (on and off campus) from October 2013. The circles provide a safe space for women [of all sexual orientations] to have heart to heart discussions on intimate topics such as relationships, love, and family, as well as current gender issues. The members also use tools, such as the peace line activity, to encourage introspection at the circles.

Women have shared tears, laughter, fears, secrets, and love at these circles. Guided by rules to ensure everyone feels respected and receives a chance to be heard, all members that attend enjoy the moments shared in the spaces. Members have used the following words to describe the circles: “Enlightening, empowering, safe, inclusive, comforting and important.”

If you are a woman attending UWI Cave Hill Campus or residing in Barbados and would feel comfortable sharing a space with women of all different sexual orientations, we encourage you to join our circles. Contact damarlieantoine [at] gmail [dot] com, or m.hutchinson1988 [at] @gmail [dot] com to be added to the mailing list. 

Below are some photos from our activities:Image

 

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Ultimate Soca Love Songs Playlist

i crowdsourced the list below in response to Georgia Popplewell’s assertion that  soca artists would

have to dig deep into their repertoires to find a song extolling the kind of values Valentine’s Day represents.

 

While she may have been speaking specifically of this year’s carnival tunes, there’s still a perception that soca artists don’t sing about love.  Caribbean music man, Stefan Walcott, had this to say:

Well there are not many due to a space and function of the music. How many Bajan folk songs speak about snow?

 

Janine Mendes-Franco produced her own list of carnival love songs but it was too short a list.  

Below is what my amazing facebook friends were able to come up with (thanks to Patrice & Kerryann who has an encyclopedic knowledge of soca).

Passion by Militant

 

All Is Yours by Onika Bostic

 

Dance With You by Machel and Mr. Vegas

 

Always Be by Patrice Roberts featuring Zan

 

Only You by Krosfyah featuring Tony Bailey

 

All Night Long by Donella Weekes

 

My Girl by Lil Rick

Kerryann also pointed me to other songs not available on youtube: Sweetest Thing by Coppa Dan, Sugary by Keann, Only You by Omar McQuilkin of Electrik.

The ways in which love and romance are scripted can often appear contrary to feminist ideals.  I had to exclude one of the suggestions due to its homophobic lyrics.  So after you’ve grooved to this playlist you may also want to check out Creative Commess’ feminist soca playlist which got a well-deserved shout out on Global Voices.

Caribbean music is all-occasions music.  Enjoy!

The Revolution Will Not Be Theorised

There will be no pictures of you and smiling African children
In the village where you did a semester abroad
As a global citizen.
No cutting-edge electronic journals will be created
To recycle the same ethno-centric ideas
The revolution will not be PDFed.

There will be no videos of you offering back-handed compliments
About how surprisingly well-read the sister from the Caribbean is
There will be no videos of you offering back-handed compliments
About how surprisingly smart the sister from the Caribbean is
There will be no blog post about post modernism vs. post structuralism
Or post-humanism or post-anythingism
For the isms and schisms would have seen their final day.
The revolution will not be digitized

There will be no conference reports
And promises to stay in touch via open source electronic platforms
No email messages clarifying if Fanon is a dancehall artist
No lazy invocations of intersectionality
And positionality at the centre of the universe
The revolution will not be digitized

The revolution will not take a break for coffee (fair trade, of course)
Dirty paper cups left on the table for some Other woman to clean
The revolution will not feature a seizure-inducing Prezi
No one will complain about the indignity of going from Mac to PC
Or mistake themselves for every other living being on the planet
The real feminist will not stand up
And pat herself or himself or hirself on the back
The revolution will remove the mic from your hand and the ground from your feet.

The revolution will not be theorised, the revolution will not be problematised
The revolution will not be workshopped, will not be workgrouped
The revolution will be no conference, sister, brother, Man.2
The revolution will be…?

© Tonya Haynes, 2011

#DearCaribbean Blog Carnival Guide & Review

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De customs man at Piarco tell me dat de only ting dey does tek from Guyana is pineapple an’ plantain. — Thoughts of a Minibus Traveller

Mas. Jouvayists from Guyana, St. Kitts & Nevis, Antigua & Barbuda, Trinidad & Tobago, The Bahamas, Barbados, Jamaica, Haiti, Curacao, Canada, the diaspora and Nigeria. Making multi-directional crossings from and to Venezuela, India, Nigeria, Flatbush and Crown Heights, T&T, Grenada, Harlem, these repeating islands of the Caribbean.

Some sweet sweet love letters to the region. Dear Caribbean: Thank you for my big headOn being the daughter discovering the home of her descendants. Love note to the Caribbean.

Meditations on Caribbean feminisms. Feminists that don’t yet know they are feminists. The risky location of being an Indian feminist in the Caribbean. The liberatory potential of Vodou.

Ruminations on Caribbean Identity. Pineapple an’ plantain only. I am Your Daughter Too.

Home. Always Home. Again and Again.

Ukranian Lessons on Regional Integration (one of the most shared e-mas submissions published on the CODE RED blog).

Ol Mas meets Queer Caribbean Sexuality. Leslie, the lesbian doll.

The art of play. Play yaself!

Meet a Caribbean woman from Haiti, Guyana or the Bahamas. Listen to the voices of Caribbean men from St. Kitts and Nevis and Guyana.

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Poetry. Trujillonomics. Caribbean Crossings, In Motion. Basseterre Woman.

Writing. Like fine wine. Exquisite.

Art. Photography. Images.

e-mas is LOVE: radical, political, Caribbean, queer, poetic, renewing. 

Like true Caribbean people many of the jouvayists turn up on Caribbean time so quite a few entries just came in.  Giving thanks to Carla Moore and Feministing for using their wide reach to give the e-mas a boost.

If this guide was a bit too dizzying you can visit the e-mas page where you can read/watch/listen/view all the posts in the order in which they were submitted.

Use #dearCaribbean on twitter to keep the vibes flowing.

One Love.

Photo credit: amina. olayiwola