Diary of a mothering worker. February 10, 2015.

“Being experts in crossings is what Caribbean people do. It’s how we learned to exist. We have crossed waters, crossed authorities, crossed junctions and junctures, and crossed everything from spiritualities to pleasures.”

grrlscene

Post 180.

Zi is at the left of the photo, last in the line Zi is at the left of the photo, last in the line (Photo: Roba Ofili)

Two hours waiting. Two minutes of playing mas. Thus went four year-old Ziya’s first time crossing the big stage.

Practice starts from young, which is clearly how committed masqueraders develop patience with long waits, and know to make the most of their few moments to put their all into display.

In a spectrum of stunning costumes, like inhabitants of a surreal alter-dimension, dozens of children somehow managed the heat, and began such early socialization to a ritual that determines the ultimate success of local music, shapes national conversation about selfhood and freedom, and establishes the most revered secular space in the country.

For us to be visible, to be seen like this, is to exist, writes scholar Gordon Rohlehr. That’s why the crescendo of the stage continues to rule the rhythm of the…

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One thought on “Diary of a mothering worker. February 10, 2015.

  1. rogerburt says:

    I’m so glad to be following your blog. As you can see on my Caribbean Dream blog I am a huge fan of the Caribbean people. And, as it turns out, a dedicated feminist.

    Like

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